Climate change: ‘Bleak’ outlook

“Climate change: ‘Bleak’ outlook as carbon emissions gap grows”

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-50547073

Climate change: Greenhouse gas concentrations again break records

Another post on climate change because it is extremely relevant to flood risk.

Sadly “Atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases once again reached new highs in 2018.”

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-50504131

Update on Seacourt P&R extension

Following up on our post of the 15th about the Seacourt P&R extension:

First, a budget figure of £5,156,122 was approved by Council in February 2019. That’s the last official figure we know of.

Second, the area remains flooded as this picture from this morning shows.

Edit – still flooded 25/11/19.

A mistake

While we wait anxiously to see whether homes, businesses and roads will flood, work on the City Council’s extension to its Seacourt Park & Ride has come to a very wet standstill.

Building a car park in a flood plain is not sensible. Work having started as the wet winter season approached, the site is now a lake and work has stopped. The JCBs have been withdrawn onto the higher ground of the existing car park, and heaps of building materials are abandoned in the water. If the construction had been completed much of the extension would currently be under water. All this while the City is on ‘only’ a Flood Alert, the lowest category of concern.

The construction costs are likely to be much higher than estimated because of the disruption caused by flood events of the kind we’re currently witnessing. Councillors ignored the reality of frequent flooding here when they approved the planning application, and now we’re seeing the consequences. The last official budget figure we’re aware of was around £4million; we have heard, from a usually reliable source, that the cost may have risen to around £6 million, even before the present flooding of the site. Is this a sensible use of tax payers’ money?

Flooding at the site began on  Monday, so it’s already been a working week that it would have been out of action if it had been built – that means lost revenue and an unreliable service. And time and money would then be needed for pumping out, clearing up and very likely making repairs before the extension could be safely reopened to the public. Further expense and further loss of revenue. Because the site is so low-lying, this will happen quite often.

Because it’s a car park and not a field there is increased risk to the public and to vehicles, and it remains to be seen how well the Council is able to manage flooding here. The water came up quite quickly at the start of the week, and in the interests of safety the extension would have had to be closed before that to avoid cars getting trapped in flood water, i.e. sometime early last week. And remember we are only on a Flood Alert, not a Flood Warning. Were people to try to enter even quite shallow floodwater to retrieve their cars things could go horribly wrong.

In the second photo above, from yesterday, you can see two large pipes floating in the lake, one in the centre, the other far over to the right against the boundary fence. If the flooding worsens these could float downstream and jam under the nearby bridge under the Botley Road, exacerbating flood risk. Were it already a car park, for pipes read cars.

We, and many others, fought this ill-conceived project hard. We hope the City Council will even now abandon it and restore the site to its previous state, as a valuable wildlife habitat, including for the badgers who have been driven out. To press on regardless means wasting ever more of Oxford’s citizens’ money, putting off for years any possible financial return to the Council, and meanwhile potentially both increasing flood risk and posing a risk to life and vehicles.

In denial?

The penny is dropping only slowly. It’s crystal clear that the climate is changing and with it the weather we can expect.

“Climate change: Warming signal links global floods and fires” https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-50407508

But, despite this, adaptation is slow. Greenpeace report here that building in UK flood plains continues apace, even being proposed in areas currently well under water.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-50419925

Oatlands Road recreation ground and Wytham Street today

The flood plain is doing its job around Oxford.

Ben Cahill writes “There has been flooding (rising ground water) this week in the back gardens of Wytham Street (see photos) which back onto Hinksey brook and the Cold Harbour scrubland. This hasn’t happened for a number of years as far as I’m told.”

Venice: flooding and climate change

Disastrous flooding in Venice https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-50416306

The mayor of Venice, Luigi Brugnaro, blamed climate change for the highest water levels in more than 50 years this week, saying the impact was “huge” and would leave “a permanent mark”.

Subsequent coverage here as a further tidal surge hits Venice https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-50430855

 

Concern in the Oxford area

There is increasing concern today that water levels are high in the Oxford area, with a good deal more water still to come down to Oxford from the Cotswolds catchment. The area is presently (midday) on an EA Flood Alert (the lowest level of concern).

We’re seeing more flooding globally, Venice is badly hit at the moment – and the awful flooding in the north of England continues.

There is no doubt that the climate is changing. Oxford has always flooded but the change will make it more common and more severe. The immediate threat may recede now, let’s hope so, but it highlights again that it’s imperative that Oxford is better protected, not only for the many people directly affected but for the city itself to continue to function and thrive into the future.

The multi-partner Oxford Flood Alleviation Scheme is in process and all concerned are working hard to make it happen as soon as humanly possible. As we have said before, “it can’t come soon enough.”

 

 

Severe flooding in Yorkshire

Exceptional rainfall has caused widespread and serious flooding in the north of England. It seems pretty clear (from this, and many other events worldwide) that climate change is happening here and now https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-50343977

Meanwhile in New South Wales a very different emergency, which again seems almost certain to be climate change related https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-australia-50341207

The list goes on.

Flood defences are sorely needed for Oxford’s river flooding, and more than ever now that we’re faced with more frequent extreme weather events. The Oxford Flood Alleviation Scheme is being developed to provide that defence.