Seacourt again

There’s a story in yesterday’s Oxford Mail on how the Seacourt P&R extension site has been getting on in the recent rather wet weather.

 

 

A close squeak

River levels upstream and in Oxford peaked overnight and, weather permitting, should now slowly but steadily continue to fall. The weather forecast, while not wall-to-wall sunshine, looks reasonably encouraging.

In the event no properties were flooded and no temporary barriers were deployed this time, though it came very close to it.

Thank you to all the many people from the Environment Agency who have monitored things closely, and made preparations to deploy defences should the need arise.

Oxford today

River levels in Oxford today have not risen as far as had been predicted. So good news so far. The EA is watching things closely for the whole area.

In the case of South Hinksey, the barriers which were delivered there this morning are to be kept in reserve for now. Barriers for other areas remain in reserve at Osney.

Barrier deployment

Temporary flood barriers will be moved from Osney to South Hinksey tomorrow, in readiness for possible deployment by the Environment Agency tomorrow or Wednesday – if conditions require. The situation following the recent rains is being closely monitored and analysed – what happens will depend on these assessments. Similar vigilance applies to the deployment of barriers for Osney Island and at Hinksey Park on the Abingdon Road: barriers for both these areas are ready at Osney if needs be. These latter areas have had temporary barriers before, whereas for South Hinksey, if it happens, it will be a first, following making the village ‘barrier-ready’. Temporary barriers are supported by high volume pumps to deal with any water leaking through the barrier or arriving within the barrier as rising groundwater.

 

Storm Dennis

Appalling floods in Wales (and elsewhere) https://www.bbc.co.uk/news

The Oxford Flood Alleviation Scheme is, unfortunately, delayed but is still as much needed as ever. In fact more so – as Earth continues to heat up the changing climate is producing more extreme weather and consequent severe flooding.

River levels above, and in and around, Oxford have already risen quite a bit since the storm’s rain over the weekend, and the next few days will see further rises in Oxford as the water makes its way downstream from the Cotswolds. It remains to be seen how big these rises are. You can follow local river levels and the flow rate upstream at Farmoor here.

Frozen

The Seacourt car park extension site has been pumped out for a few days following Storm Brendan which has brought huge amounts of water from our extensive catchment in the Cotswolds. But today the site is again filled with water, which has frozen overnight.

The trauma of flooding

Unsurprisingly, flooding has both short and long term adverse effects on people’s physical and mental health and wellbeing.

A BBC article today ‘Communities in Calderdale ‘traumatised’ by 2015 floods’ illustrates just how traumatic flooding can be. Here’s a short excerpt:

“Every time it rains you can feel the tension,” said Hebden Bridge flood warden Andrew Entwistle. “Especially when the sirens go off, you can feel the anxiety radiating from people, asking what the situation is and how bad it’s going to get.”

Back in 2015, the former firefighter was eating a late Christmas Day lunch when the flood alert was first sounded – signalling the start of heavy rain which led to the River Calder bursting its banks. Some 18 months later, the 76-year-old turned to counselling to help him deal with what he had witnessed.

He recalls: “I’ve been used to handling floods and disasters but this was on another level. One lady collapsed on the street in front of me. The stress levels and sheer amount of tragedy that unfolded is indescribable and those feelings don’t just disappear.”

Seacourt P&R extension – further updates

Work began again briefly as mentioned in the last post. Water was pumped from the site into a ditch newly dug nearby and leading to Seacourt Stream.

River levels have now risen further. Pumping has stopped and the site is again abandoned.

Were it a car park it would be unusable of course.

This post will be updated periodically (see photos).

Work resumed on 7 January 2020. This latest flood was another 18 days, taking total flooding of the site this winter to 6 weeks 5 days. The prediction in the planning application was for 2 weeks a year. It remains to be seen how it averages out over a number of years.

Work resumed at Seacourt P&R today

Work resumed at Seacourt P&R extension today, 4 weeks and a day after it had to stop because the site had flooded. Here is the sequence from 11 November to today.