Our “2016” Annual Public Meeting – in Feb 2017

We hold an Annual Public Meeting, which has been in November up to now. This makes it close to the annual Oxford Area Flood Partnership meeting and the two have increasingly overlapped in content. We decided then that our “2016” meeting would be better held later. It will be on Wednesday 22 February 2017 at 7pm for 7.30. The venue as before, the Demos’ Club on Osney Island, Oxford. We will have speakers from the Environment Agency (on the Oxford Flood Alleviation Scheme), Thames Water (on their sewer survey) and Network Rail (on their track raising, waterway clearance and culvert installation). Everybody is very welcome.

A talk: Oxford and the Thames – a national hotspot for freshwater wildlife

Later this month,  Dr Jeremy Biggs of the Freshwater Habitats Trust will be giving a talk at South Hinksey Village Hall, on Wednesday 29 June at 2pm titled Oxford and the Thames: a national hotspot for freshwater wildlife, in association with the Oxford Flood Alliance.
 
He’ll look at what makes the Oxford area a national hotspot for freshwater wildlife, what problems freshwaters in the area face and what the solutions are. He’ll consider what the impact of the new flood channel could be and how it could help reverse the century-long decline in the areas freshwaters. There is more information at http://freshwaterhabitats.org.uk/news/oxford-and-the-thames-a-national-hotspot/ or in the flyer Oxford and the Thames_talk flyer_Jun16 FINAL.
  

The talk is free and anyone may attend but space is limited so if you think you would like to come along please let Jo Fever at Freshwater Habitats know so we can try and ensure there is space for all: info@freshwaterhabitats.org.uk or phone 01865 595505.

 
 

 

 

Cambridge ‘Moisture in Buildings’ conference

Following an invitation from Steve Hodgson of the Property Care Association, Adrian Porter of OFA spoke at their ‘Moisture in Buildings’ conference in Cambridge on 12 May 2016. Adrian writes:

‘It was interesting to be able to inform the building trade of the direct benefit that their work can have on consumers, from a very personal perspective, and also how they and the insurance industry need to collaborate to enable homeowners to make the right decision on property level protection.

I was pleasantly surprised to find that not only do the PCA acknowledge the need to improve standards across the building sector, but also that their members are hugely passionate about resolving the problems created by poor workmanship once and for all, for each homeowner.’

Delegate comments and the presentations can be found here:
http://www.property-care.org/annual-conference-2016/review-conference-moisture-buildings/

Natural flood management, climate change and Oxford: a symposium

Oxford Flood Alliance are hosting their Second Flood Symposium this week, in collaboration with the Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford. The meeting is fully subscribed.

The topic is Natural flood management, climate change and Oxford.
We will publish a summary of the proceedings on this website.

Meeting with senior members of the Environment Agency

8 November 2010

Peter Rawcliffe, representing the Oxford Flood Alliance, met with David Jordan, national Director of Operations at the Environment Agency, John Russon, Head of Operations, Howard Davidson, Regional Director, and Matt Carter and Barry Russell from the local EA area, on a recent visit to Oxford. We were pleased to have such an opportunity.

A wide-ranging discussion included:

A presentation by OFA emphasising the crucial importance of improving things at Munday’s underbridge in north Kennington.

How community flood groups form and become involved (‘the Big Society’) in working with the EA on flooding. The difficulties of establishing such engagement where it does not already exist.

Attitude to risk and particularly how it relates to the Big Scheme (OFRMS) for Oxford. OFA said there was public scepticism about whether the Big Scheme would ever happen and that people would like things done now to remedy obvious deficiencies, making the most of what already exists, even though they together fall short of a 1 in 100 year standard of protection (as is inevitable).

Once such remedial measures were taken, then incremental improvements to existing watercourses, particularly widening Hinksey Stream, working up the floodplain, might be a sensible approach, rather than relying on a possible new grand Western Conveyance which might very well never materialise.

Having said all that, information gathered for the Big Scheme can inform decisions in the meantime and if climate change makes things worse it might then be implemented. We suggested that improvements now should not be put off for fear of jeopardising the value for money of the Big Scheme – because of the very real and widespread doubt as to it ever materialising (even were no improvements made in the meantime).