New Chair of RFCC visits Oxford

The recently appointed new Chair of Thames Regional Flood and Coastal Committee (RFCC), Professor Robert Van de Noort, visited Oxford on 19 October with EA staff. He was briefed on the Oxford Flood Alleviation Scheme and then shown the Seacourt area at the western end of the Botley Road, which marks the northern end of the Scheme.

We were pleased to meet Professor Van de Noort in South Hinksey, where he went on to see both the lie of the land where the channel will come past the village and on to Kennington to the south, and the earthworks done in the village itself to make the village ‘temporary barrier ready’ for the coming winter and beyond.

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South Hinksey ‘barrier-ready’ works all but complete

In South Hinksey, the works designed to make deploying temporary defences, should flooding threaten, quicker and easier, are almost complete.

Three flap valves have just been installed on pipes which connect into field ditches. These non-return valves will allow water out from within any temporary barrier but not allow it back in from the flooded area outside.

Elsewhere wide garden gates have been installed, reinforced fences built, and removable fence panels fitted.

A very few minor snagging items remain, but the scheme is otherwise complete and fully ready for temporary barriers. Many thanks to the Vale of White Horse District Council for funding and to the Environment Agency for organising the work – not least to engineer Magnus Williams who has managed the scheme from its inception to its completion. Thanks too to farmer Nick Frearson, and to the horse owners for their cooperation during the works.

Meeting in South Hinksey

South Hinksey concrete flood wall, March 2014, post-floodOn Thursday evening 16 July,  30 or so parishioners met in South Hinksey Village Hall with Peter Collins and Magnus Williams from the Environment Agency (EA). We were pleased that local farmer Nick Frearson and a land agent on behalf of landowner Oxford City Council, were present too: they are important stakeholders in the project.

Groundwork
Engineer Magnus Williams presented his initial design ideas for groundwork to support deployment of temporary barriers for the village when flooding threatens. Magnus is talking to individual householders to ensure that everyone is happy with the specifics of the proposals.
We’re grateful to the Vale of White Horse District Council for providing £60k for the works and to the EA for providing the engineering design input, obtaining of permissions and so on.
We hope that things can move ahead as fast as possible as winter approaches and the risk of our flooding increases yet again.

Oxford FAS
Peter Collins, EA’s Asset Management Performance Team Leader for the Oxford area updated us on the aims and progress of the scheme.

Many thanks to Magnus and Peter for giving up their evening to meet us, much appreciated.

South Hinksey groundwork – update

South Hinksey: groundwork for temporary flood barriers

Permissions have to be obtained, plans drawn and contracts agreed, so it will be a time till diggers appear. Funding is thanks to the Vale of White Horse District Council. Execution is shared between the Council and the Environment Agency.  Surveying has begun. Work on the ground is now expected to begin in September.

South Hinksey barrier-ready groundwork given the go-ahead

South Hinksey’s community demo last October sought financial support for groundwork so we would be able to use temporary flood barriers to protect the village. Great news that our Vale District Council has agreed to pay for this groundwork – needed to level the land, and provide for crossing a field ditch.

Permissions have to be sought, plans drawn and contracts agreed, so it will be some time till diggers appear. Surveying has already begun.

While the Environment Agency cannot promise barriers till the day, the omens are good. The ground will be ready, as will our community team to put the barrier up.

Temporary barriers for the Hinksey Park area

22 September 2009

The Environment Agency demonstrated their new demountable (temporary) flood barriers for the Lake Street / Vicarage Road area this afternoon. The well-attended event showed the barriers being put into place – over 300m in about 1.5 hours. These barriers are to protect houses in Lake Street and surrounding roads which have flooded in recent years.

Hinksey Park barriers

3 September 2009

On Tuesday 22 September, the Environment Agency will be demonstrating to the public the use of its new demountable flood barriers for Hinksey Park. From 1pm to 3pm, teams will be showing residents how the barriers are erected and dismantled and the speed with which they can be deployed. Experts will be on hand to answer questions.
The barriers are of the same design as those demonstrated to the public at Osney Island in July 2008.
The demountable barriers for Hinksey Park were purchased by the Environment Agency as part of its £1.8m Short Term Measures programme for Oxford. They will help reduce flood risk in Vicarage Lane and Lake Street from the Hinksey Lakes.